Sugar sugar: Ukrainian honey cake

First of all, exciting news: Good Food on Bad Plates is now on Instagram! At the moment we’re in the process of uploading photos from all of our international cooking adventures so far, but we’re also updating it with other experiments and extra content. You can find us at @goodfoodonbadplates

Now, moving on to today’s Ukrainian feature. We can’t be the only people to have a file of ‘to cook’ dishes: recipes that have been cut out of magazines or printed from food blogs, that looked amazing at the time but have since been relegated to the depths of the file and forgotten about. Our file is pretty sizeable and exists in a pretty kikki.k ring binder bought for us by Miranda’s sister. Some sections are full to bursting and we frequently comment that we really should have a go at some of the recipes inside, but then get distracted by a new cookbook or a new country to investigate and the ring binder goes back on the shelf, unloved.

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Post-holiday poultry: Georgian chakhokbili

We recently returned from a few days away in Madeira, known as a holiday destination for ‘newlyweds and nearly-deads.’ To the best of our knowledge (and optimism), we’re neither of those, but we quite fancied a bit of sunshine and warmth somewhere a bit different, and that’s exactly what we got. Madeira was stunningly beautiful, with its mountainous landscapes and balmy temperatures. You need longer than the three-and-a-half days that we had to properly explore it, but we did our best to scrape the surface in as much detail as possible, despite finding out too late that our last day was a public holiday and therefore some of the things we wanted to do weren’t open! We managed the most important thing, though – drinking madeira in Madeira – and that’s what counts.

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Porridge as you’ve never seen it before: Armenian harissa and khorvadzed vegetables

This recipe will challenge everything you ever thought you knew about both porridge and harissa. Like most people in this part of the world, porridge for us is a breakfast food (or, admittedly for Miranda, a lazy dinner), with a base of oats and greatly improved by such additions as cinnamon, honey, peanut butter or, for a festive twist, fruit mince (seriously – try it). Likewise, as far as we knew, harissa was a delicious chilli paste used in North African cuisine.

Then we searched for ‘Armenian national dish.’

Armenia lies in the mountains between Asia and Europe, and its cuisine is characterised by fresh ingredients, and wheat in a variety of forms. If its national dish of harissa is anything to go by, simplicity is also key, as this dish really only has two main ingredients: wheat and chicken. We opted for a recipe from SBS because it used pearl barley (which we could easily get hold of) rather than wheat (which we couldn’t). It’s therefore not 100% traditional, but seems to be pretty close. Continue reading