Clearing the cobwebs: Puerto Rican pan de Mallorcas

We didn’t even have anything to drink on Saturday night, but if we had, we’re pretty sure our three-step plan from Sunday morning would have had us fighting fit again in no time, so we would heartily recommend it:

1. Go for a walk in the woods and get some fresh air (bonus points for walking up some steep hills)
2. Try an excellent local café that you really should have tried earlier, given how long you’ve lived in the area, and sample their delicious cakes
3. Go home and make Puerto Rican pan de Mallorca sandwiches for lunch.

Puerto Rico’s national dish is actually rice with pigeon peas, but as we made that for Anguilla, we cast our recipe search net wider and eventually decided than pan de Mallorca would work as a stand-in. Pan de Mallorca is actually just the roll itself, which is a sweet, buttery scroll-style bread that can be traced back to the ensaïmada, a coiled pastry from the Spanish island of Mallorca. In Puerto Rico, however, they take it one step further and add ham and cheese, and sometimes an egg, to create a sweet and savoury sandwich combination that we just had to try! Continue reading

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A lucky gamble: Tunisian kosksi

Making something you’ve never made before for guests is always a bit of a risk. We really learnt this the hard way when we made Lao dtom jeaw pla (fish soup) for a friend a few years ago. We maybe should have predicted in advance that a batch of soup containing 10-12 red bird’s eye chillies would be on the spicy side – and it certainly was. All three of us were running for the tissues by the time we’d finished eating it!

Still, learning from your mistakes is boring, so once again we decided to make what seemed like a fairly chilli-heavy dish for some friends earlier in the week: Tunisian kosksi. Kosksi itself simply means couscous, but it is typically served in Tunisia with a meat stew of some kind, and we opted for lamb as our meat, in a recipe that included both harissa and chilli powder. What sets Tunisia’s version apart from other neighbouring countries’ couscous recipes is its red colour (due to the tomato used).

The problem with most recipes for kosksi is that they assume that the couscous starts in its original, unrefined form, whereas what we get in UK supermarkets is actually parcooked, which is why you can make it so quickly. We chose a recipe from 196 Flavors because it had already been adjusted to accommodate for parcooked couscous. It was, however, a little vague on how to prepare the vegetables, so what follows is what we did. Continue reading

Good wifing: US Virgin Island banana nut tea bread

When you think of Australian foods, it’s usually Vegemite and ‘shrimp on the barbie’ that come to mind. However, for us, there’s something else that excites us whenever we’re fortunate enough to visit the Land Down Under: banana bread. In Australia, banana bread can be found in just about any café you enter, and is ideal for both breakfast and morning tea (‘elevenses’ in the UK). It is just as good whether it’s toasted or not.

Sadly, this trend has not yet reached the UK (although the flat white has, so there’s still hope). We do make our own banana bread semi-regularly, and tend to eat it for either breakfast or dessert. It has fruit in it, so it counts as one of your five-a-day, right? Continue reading

Why not try this to-marrow: Maltese stuffed courgettes

#puntastic

Today finds us in the unusual position of cooking a dish from a country one of us (Ash) has been to before, and a dish that we have a recipe for in one of our cookbooks. The official national dish of Malta is stuffat tal-fenek, a rabbit stew, but we said from the start that if we already had a recipe from a country, we’d make it, which is how we decided to make stuffed marrow from The Hairy Bikers’ Best-Loved Recipes: Mums still know best.

Ash’s strongest culinary memories from a university rugby tour to Malta are of horse and snails: part of a pre-match feast with the locals. The horsemeat was apparently supposed to make them strong and indeed fuelled the Exeter University team to a significant victory over the Presidents XV the following day.

1095a Rugby tour photo Continue reading