More chicken and rice – this time with seeds: Guatemalan pepián

Firstly, for those following the turmeric woes that accompanied our Christmas Islander dish, we’re happy to report that Vanish is capable of miracles and both items of potentially ruined clothing were saved. Hurrah! #notanad

But now for our latest meal: Guatemalan pepián. Yet another incarnation of chicken and rice, this dish is a typical street food from Guatemala. Having made it, our opinion is that we wouldn’t want to be in a street stall faffing around with all the necessary components, so all power to the Guatemalans.

This dish was also a blast from the past for Miranda, due to the inclusion of a vegetable known as guisquil, chayote, chow chow, mirliton squash or (as is the case in Australia) choko. Of course the Australian name ends with an o! It’s native to Central America and rarely seen in the UK, but widely grown in Australia and NZ. Miranda remembers a childhood of eating them after they’d been boiled to oblivion and sprinkled with black pepper. Fortunately, our multicultural locale enabled us to get hold of one for the pepián – the recipe for which we found thanks to a feature in the Guardian by Guatemalan Rudy Girón. We weren’t, unfortunately, able to source one of the chillies, so we’ll put the traditional requirements below and discuss our substitutes afterwards. Continue reading

Turmeric and breastfeeding don’t mix: Christmas Islander ayam panggang

If you read our last post, you might recall that we hadn’t yet chosen between Guatemala or Christmas Island for our next culinary journey. Each country’s national dish is a version of chicken, chilli and rice, but Ash decided we should start with Christmas Island’s coconut-heavy ayam panggang, in the spirit of getting it over with. As such, we’ve now made it through our list of ‘catch up’ countries, so the order of our future posts will be more geographically logical.

Christmas Island is a tiny Australian territory in the Indian Ocean with a population of less than 1500. It’s not far from Indonesia and its cuisine is therefore strongly influenced by South East Asian flavours. Once again, we are grateful to Travel by Stove for doing the (considerable) legwork for this recipe so that we, in our perpetual state of sleep deprivation, didn’t have to. Continue reading