An adventure in ingredients: Grenadian oil down

We would recommend having the following before attempting this recipe:
– A small army to feed (or the common sense to scale down the recipe)
– An enormous cooking pot (or the common sense to scale down the recipe)
– Access to a wide range of ingredients

Now that we have that settled…

Oil down is the national dish of the Caribbean island of Grenada (not to be confused with the Spanish city Granada), so named because of the oils released from the coconut milk as it simmers. It is a big stew, packed full of a long list of ingredients, some we’d eaten before and some we hadn’t. We got our recipe for oil down from Becca at Meat Loves Salt, and would suggest reading her post about it for a lot more insight than we can provide and more Caribbean ingredient recommendations (we had to make a few substitutions). What we can offer, however, is the experiences of total novices. Our recipe below, therefore, is based on Becca’s, but also anecdotal. Continue reading

Mega mac and cheese: Sammarinese nidi di rondine

It’s kind of ironic that we’re posting this recipe today, because it’s the total opposite of the way we’ve been eating lately. Last weekend, we returned from a holiday in Australia which was full of indulging in the nation’s finest seafood, wines and ice cream (to name a few delicacies). Since returning home, we’ve been rather more abstinent – which is definitely not a word you would use to describe San Marino’s national dish, nidi di rondine (swallows’ nests), which we made and ate before we went away. With a list of ingredients that mainly centres around cheese, meat and pasta, this is definitely an indulgence – but such a worthy one! We got our recipe from All That Cooking. Continue reading

In memory of Crabby: Trinbagonian callaloo

Sometimes in life, the effort you put into something is disproportionate to the reward you get from it. It’s just one of those things.

Another one of those things is that sometimes in life, you can’t help but sit back and think, ‘Well, I’m glad that’s over.’

Our callaloo experience was, if nothing else, memorable. Continue reading

Seven years of frying: Tibetan shapale

Regular readers will have noticed that we tend to follow a rough geographical order when making our international recipes, so would rightly be slightly confused by the fact that we’ve now jumped from Bermuda to Tibet. This is because when we started this project, our list of countries followed a rule whereby each country bordered the countries on either side of it on the list, but there was no way to take this linear approach and also include all the countries – so we have a separate list of ‘leftover’ countries. Now that we’ve reached the Caribbean islands (of which there are a lot, and if the Pacific Islands are anything to go by, they’re all likely to offer up quite similar foods), we thought we’d intersperse them with those leftover countries. So: Tibet. Continue reading

A Bermuda short: Bermudian fish chowder

Before making this dish, we knew two things about Bermuda: shorts and Triangle. We’ve now bumped this up to three things, having added its traditional fish chowder to our repertoire. Unlike the creamy, thick chowders we’re used to, Bermuda’s version has a tomato base and isn’t stodgy at all. It’s also very spicy, thanks to the addition of chilli sauce (more on that in a minute) and is so full of vegetables that ‘fish chowder’ is almost a misnomer. Recipes on the Internet are all pretty similar but we thought The Bermudian seemed a reputable enough source – we just made a few tweaks here and there. Continue reading

Yankee foodle dandy: American meatloaf, pancakes, chicken and biscuits, and apple pie

827a American flag compressed

We’ve only been to the USA once, in August 2013, when we visited Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and New York City. We were there for ten days and were overwhelmed by the size of everything (security queues at Dulles Airport, hotel rooms, food portions, personalities, buildings, roads, monuments, duration of baseball games…) – but in such a good way. We crammed a lot into our relatively short stay, and fell in love with the Land of Liberty, and we can’t wait to go back!

Of course, for us, a major part of any successful holiday is the food. As well as trying to follow in the footsteps of Man v. Food’s Adam Richman wherever we went, and making sure we had Philly in Philly/New York strip in New York/Long Island Iced Tea on Long Island, and eating bologna without really understanding what it is, we dined at a farm-to-table restaurant in Washington, ate cheesesteaks and hoagies at a ball game in Philadelphia, and visited the legendary Katz’s Deli (of When Harry Met Sally fame) in NYC. Not to mention the piece of red velvet cheesecake at Junior’s Diner that defeated even Ash. Continue reading

Away and home: Canadian (Quebecois) mussel chowder

Leaving the food of Europe behind (for now) and jumping over to the Americas feels like we’ve really made some progress in this cooking journey. We started in Wales and have made our way through most of Europe, Asia and Oceania, discovering so many new dishes (and ingredients) along the way. Now we’re embarking on a whole new region, starting with Canada, which we are excited about – but which also posed a problem.

Many of you will be aware that Canada’s national dish is poutine: fries, cheese curds and gravy. Poutine seemed to experience a bit of a rebirth in London a couple of years ago, probably partially because of the ‘it’s cool to eat really unhealthy food and Instagram it’ age we’re in. (Speaking of which, remember that you can follow us on Instagram @goodfoodonbadplates – with very little unhealthy food, in fact!) We’d never actually tried it though, so the idea of making our own was quite fun… until we realised that we don’t have a deep fryer so wouldn’t be making brilliant fries, didn’t know where we’d get cheese curds from, and probably wouldn’t make gravy worthy of this revered dish. Continue reading