Not for the faint-hearted: Montserratian goat water

We approached this recipe with some trepidation. Yes, it really does say 4-5 scotch bonnet chillies. Knowing how hot just one of these bad boys can make a dish, we nearly chickened out, but in the end we decided that we do like spicy food, we could talk ourselves into being brave for one meal, and if it really was unbearably hot, we had plenty of yoghurt in the fridge. Thus, our Montserratian goat water journey of discovery began.

Goat water is also referred to as kiddy stew, which is obviously in reference to the term for a baby goat but is also quite ironic in that you would never dare serve this volcanic concoction to a human kiddy. It is the national dish of the island of Montserrat, a small Caribbean island with a population of less than 5000, all of whom clearly have strong constitutions and steel-lined digestive systems. Many of Montserrat’s inhabitants also have Irish ancestry, so there is a good chance that goat water is a descendant of Irish stew – just with a considerable Caribbean twist. Continue reading

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Autumn warmer: Guadeloupe porc-colombo

We recently spent two weeks in South Africa and had a wonderful time. Although much of the holiday centred around food, drink and outdoor activities (as is typical for us), it was in other ways unlike any other holiday we’ve taken before, and we wished we had time to see and do more. Sadly, though, our jobs beckoned, so we had to cut it off at two weeks.

In addition to the bounteous (and cheap!) food and wine, fascinating social dynamics and incredible wildlife experiences, one thing we particularly enjoyed was the glorious weather. We spent our last few days in the far north of the country, right near the Botswana-South Africa border, and temperatures were in the mid-to-high 30s every day. To look on the bright side of returning to a crisp English autumn day, the colours were vibrant and beautiful, but the 30 degree drop in temperature between getting on the plane in Johannesburg and getting off at Heathrow was not appreciated! Fortunately, we had a Guadeloupe curry to warm us up. Continue reading

New chicken routine: Sri Lankan kothu roti

Regular readers of this blog will know that when we first started this ‘cook around the world’ challenge, we said that if we had a cookbook with a recipe in it that we could use, we would use it instead of trying to find a recipe on the Internet. When we realised that Sri Lanka was the next country on our list, we were therefore excited, as we hadn’t been able to use one of our cookbooks for a while, and we were sure to have a Sri Lankan recipe with which to break that drought.

Well, imagine our surprise when we found that within our 150+ cookbooks, there is not a single Sri Lankan recipe – at least not one that we could lay our hands on. Indian, yes; Cambodian, yes; Bangladeshi, yes – but Sri Lankan was nowhere to be seen. The good news here is that we clearly have a need to buy another cookbook…

Not to be deterred, our next port of call was Miranda’s friend Lucy, who travelled to Sri Lanka last year and, as a fellow foodie, may have had a recipe for us. She didn’t, but she did suggest kothu roti as a dish that ‘everyone eats everywhere’ in Sri Lanka. Having had an average version of this at a local establishment fairly recently, the challenge to better their version seemed like a worthy one, so the kothu roti recipe search began. Continue reading

Bank holiday burgers: Montenegrin pljeskavica and ajvar

‘Bank holiday’ and ‘beautiful weather’ are two phrases which are rarely found together in the same paragraph, let alone the same sentence, but we experienced a happy aberration this weekend, which saw three gloriously sunny days in a row. I think the explanation for this incredible phenomenon is the fact that we weren’t camping: we had initially planned to, but that plan fell through, and you can bet your bottom dollar that if we had been out in the wilderness somewhere, it would have tanked it down the whole time.

What makes all of this even more amazing is the fact that the weather is set to return to its usual gloomy self throughout the rest of this working week (16 degrees and heavy rain, anyone?), making our good fortune on the weekend even more, well, fortunate. So believe us when we say that we did our best to make the most of it! Continue reading

An adventure in ingredients: Grenadian oil down

We would recommend having the following before attempting this recipe:
– A small army to feed (or the common sense to scale down the recipe)
– An enormous cooking pot (or the common sense to scale down the recipe)
– Access to a wide range of ingredients

Now that we have that settled…

Oil down is the national dish of the Caribbean island of Grenada (not to be confused with the Spanish city Granada), so named because of the oils released from the coconut milk as it simmers. It is a big stew, packed full of a long list of ingredients, some we’d eaten before and some we hadn’t. We got our recipe for oil down from Becca at Meat Loves Salt, and would suggest reading her post about it for a lot more insight than we can provide and more Caribbean ingredient recommendations (we had to make a few substitutions). What we can offer, however, is the experiences of total novices. Our recipe below, therefore, is based on Becca’s, but also anecdotal. Continue reading

Seven years of frying: Tibetan shapale

Regular readers will have noticed that we tend to follow a rough geographical order when making our international recipes, so would rightly be slightly confused by the fact that we’ve now jumped from Bermuda to Tibet. This is because when we started this project, our list of countries followed a rule whereby each country bordered the countries on either side of it on the list, but there was no way to take this linear approach and also include all the countries – so we have a separate list of ‘leftover’ countries. Now that we’ve reached the Caribbean islands (of which there are a lot, and if the Pacific Islands are anything to go by, they’re all likely to offer up quite similar foods), we thought we’d intersperse them with those leftover countries. So: Tibet. Continue reading

Yankee foodle dandy: American meatloaf, pancakes, chicken and biscuits, and apple pie

827a American flag compressed

We’ve only been to the USA once, in August 2013, when we visited Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and New York City. We were there for ten days and were overwhelmed by the size of everything (security queues at Dulles Airport, hotel rooms, food portions, personalities, buildings, roads, monuments, duration of baseball games…) – but in such a good way. We crammed a lot into our relatively short stay, and fell in love with the Land of Liberty, and we can’t wait to go back!

Of course, for us, a major part of any successful holiday is the food. As well as trying to follow in the footsteps of Man v. Food’s Adam Richman wherever we went, and making sure we had Philly in Philly/New York strip in New York/Long Island Iced Tea on Long Island, and eating bologna without really understanding what it is, we dined at a farm-to-table restaurant in Washington, ate cheesesteaks and hoagies at a ball game in Philadelphia, and visited the legendary Katz’s Deli (of When Harry Met Sally fame) in NYC. Not to mention the piece of red velvet cheesecake at Junior’s Diner that defeated even Ash. Continue reading