Twist on a classic: Icelandic skyr crème brûlée

Some things we think of when we think of Iceland:
1. It’s somewhere we want to go, but we haven’t managed it yet.
2. An amusing story of friends who spent one night there en route to the US and didn’t manage to see quite as much of it as they wanted to because they booked a hotel miles away from Reykjavik (the perpetrator of this crime is is still hearing about that from his wife some years later).
3. A ubiquitous frozen food supermarket, in which we almost never shop because we don’t buy convenience foods, but which has recently found itself firmly in our good books because of its vow to remove palm oil from its own-label products AND its quest to remove plastic packaging from its own-label products.
4. The fact that when I sat down to write this blog, I got distracted by a video of members of the cast of Friends appearing on The Graham Norton Show which had an ad for Iceland (the supermarket) in the middle of it. Serendipity.

One thing we don’t think of when we think of Iceland:
1. Classic French cookery.

Yet, somehow, we’ve made a crème brûlée. Why? How? Well, it’s a combination of things. Continue reading

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Olympic level cheese fest: Dutch Antilles keshi yena

‘Netherlands Antilles – I know them! They’re from the Olympics,’ was Ash’s response when we read the next nation on our list. Now, obviously every country is potentially ‘from the Olympics’ (cue debate about whether the four GB nations should be represented individually in the Olympics like they are in the Commonwealth Games), but Ash’s point was that the only place he’d ever heard of the Netherlands Antilles was via Olympics coverage. That was one step ahead of Miranda, who didn’t think she’d ever heard of it at all.

Further research revealed that the Netherlands Antilles consists of several island territories, including Aruba and Curacao, which Miranda had actually heard of. It also begged (and continues to beg) the question of whether we’ve cheated a bit with this one: it’s not really clear whether each of those island territories should really be considered nations in their own right – they’re ‘constituent countries’, but does that mean they’re actually countries? This dilemma was solved to an extent when we realised that they pretty much share a national dish, keshi yena… so we just made that. Continue reading

When a surplus of cake slows you down: Greenlandic kalaallit kaagiat

We don’t know a great deal about Greenland. We briefly considered going there for our honeymoon, because it was somewhere totally different and also because we have one of those scratch-off-the-places-you’ve-visited maps and, because of the skew of the map, Greenland is huge, making it a more lucrative scratching exercise than, say, the Maldives. However, we then considered the fact that actually, it’s pretty cold, so opted against it.

Otherwise, essentially all we knew about Greenland came from Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow, a novel that Miranda bought in conjunction with our weekend in Copenhagen a couple of years ago. Set in both Copenhagen and Gela Alta (a remote Greenlandic island), it is a weighty and dense tome, and one that took Miranda quite a lot of time to trudge through, the main end result being that our impression of Greenland as a cold, barren wasteland was essentially confirmed.

Upon reaching Greenland in our cooking challenge, we learnt one more thing: the national dish of Greenland is suaasat, a soup that is often made from seal, whale, reindeer or seabirds. They also enjoy mattak, which is raw whale skin and blubber. Hmmm. Problem number one.

Not particularly wanting to cook or eat either of these dishes (not to mention the question of where we would even get hold of any seal or whale), we were relieved to discover the blog of Rachel Cotterill, who introduced us to kalaallit kaagiat, or ‘Greenlandic cake.’ That sounded more like something we could get on board with! Continue reading

A four-part feast: Kittian stewed saltfish, spicy plantains, seasoned breadfruit and coconut dumplings

Once again, readers, we greet you after something of a hiatus, partly because of an extremely busy couple of weeks and partly because after making the national dishes of Saint Kitts and Nevis three weeks ago, we then misplaced our camera so couldn’t upload the photos. Now, finding ourselves with both a retrieved camera and a spare few minutes, here we are!

Still on our quest around the Caribbean islands, we learnt that the national dish of Saint Kitts and Nevis is stewed saltfish, spicy plantains, seasoned breadfruit and coconut dumplings. We found ourselves simultaneously grateful that we live somewhere that has all of these ingredients within easy reach and (not for the first time) resentful that, as we’ve learnt before, breadfruit costs more than any other fruit or vegetable in the world ever. As it happens, so does jackfruit, which is what Ash (who did the shopping) came home with instead of breadfruit, making Miranda also resentful that the market stall owner had led him astray, jackfruit being significantly less enjoyable than breadfruit (in our opinion, at least). Never mind! Continue reading

Cake recipe as you’ve never known it: Buns of TAAF

Readers, we once again apologise for the length of time it has been since our last blog post. It’s partly due to a particularly busy time, but more to do with the fact that Terres australes et antarctiques francaise (TAAF), or the French Southern and Antarctic Lands to you and me, isn’t really a real country. Well, it is, but no one lives there, and as a result, no one really cooks there, so recipes are pretty hard to come by.

Whilst we usually wish we were the first to come up with the idea of cooking one dish from every country in the world so that we could become rich and famous and quit our day jobs, it’s times like these that we are grateful for the trailblazers who have paved the way ahead of us. Thanks to Travel by Stove, we found a recipe for Buns of TAAF, which may actually be called that or may have just been christened that by Google Translate. Either way, it was good enough for us, except for the fact that we had a house full of not only Christmas cake but also Miranda’s birthday cake, so we had to wait a few weeks before it was practical to make it. But wait we did, and make we did, and today we bring you the results (although technically we only made a singular Bun of TAAF, as we halved the recipe). Continue reading

Easing back in: Antiguan tropical curried chicken salad baguette

Happy New Year, readers! Who else can’t believe that it’s already 2018? 2017 seems to have disappeared in an utter blur.

Now, if you’re the sort of person who reads a food blog, you’re probably also the sort of person who ate far too much food over the festive period, and also probably contributed to at least some of the cooking. Perhaps, then, like us, you’re not averse to the odd really easy recipe now that it’s January, or the odd light, not-indulgent-at-all dinner. If so, read on… Continue reading

Festive colours: Vatican (Florentine) tomato soup

Finally, we again find ourselves in a country we have actually visited. We spent a rainy weekend in Rome in February 2014 and of course visited Vatican City while we were there. Vatican City (or, to use its full name, Vatican City State) lies within Rome’s borders and is the smallest state in the world by both area (110 acres) and population (1000). Other than being the home of the Pope, it is most well-known for its extensive museum (including the Sistine Chapel) and St Peter’s Basilica, both of which we visited.

1025a Vatican scale model compressed

1026a Vatican Museums compressed

1027a St Peter's compressed Continue reading