A series of discoveries: Maldivian mas riha

If you type ‘Maldives national dish’ into Google (other search engines are available), you are presented with a one word response: Fish. Not terribly helpful. Reading a little more reveals that the favourite fish of the Maldivians is tuna, which was good news for us because we consider a beautiful, just-seared fillet of tuna to be a real treat. It’s something we don’t eat a lot, though, because it’s so expensive, so when we found out that a typically Maldivian way of preparing it is mas riha (curry), we were faced with a dilemma. Did we really want to spend premium prices on a premium product to then hide it in a spicy coconut sauce?

Luckily for us, the solution was literally placed right in front of us. When we were waiting in line at the fishmonger for the snapper for our Martiniquais dish, we noticed that they had one kilo bags of frozen tuna fillets for £8. They weren’t going to be any good for sashimi, but for a curry, we figured it was a pretty safe bet. And the gamble paid off! Continue reading

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Caribbean riffing: Martiniquais grilled snapper with sauce au chien

We each learnt a valuable lesson in the making of this recipe:
Ash: If you use up all the garlic and don’t tell Wifey, she won’t put it on the shopping list and therefore won’t buy any more.
Miranda: A whole fried fish is hard to take a decent photo of (especially when using an iPhone instead of a camera).

Nonetheless, here we are, with a slightly improvised version of one of Martinique’s national dishes and our best attempts at photographing it! We say ‘one of’because research would suggest that there are actually three: a lamb curry, a fish stew, and this one, grilled snapper with sauce au chien. Yes, that does mean ‘dog sauce’ in English. No, we’re not sure why. The recipe we used describes it as ‘an exotic vinaigrette made with herbs, chillies, aromatic vegetables and lime juice’, which sounds much more appealing. Continue reading

Another twist on fish and chips: Saint Lucian green figs and salt fish

For a young Miranda, the concept of St Lucia was a bit confusing. More familiar with the geography of Brisbane than that of the Caribbean, she knew St Lucia as an affluent suburb that was the home of the University of Queensland (where she would eventually study), not a mountainous island nation.

969b UQ

969c Graduation

However, a couple of university degrees and a good dose of worldliness will teach a person that there can be more than one place with the same name, and it’s a good thing too, because the traditional food of St Lucia, Brisbane, is probably a few slices from UQ’s Pizza Caffe: delicious, but not the significantly more unusual meal we had for dinner last night. Also, Caribbean St Lucia is really pretty.

969d St Lucia

Upon learning that St Lucia’s national dish is green figs and salt fish, at first we were expecting unripe figs on our plates, but were relieved to discover that this actually refers to green bananas, which we discovered were something of an equivalent to potatoes when we cooked Grenadian oil down. It was at this point that we realised that another spin on fish and chips was on the menu! Continue reading

Sunshine on a rainy day: Barbadian cou-cou and fish

One thing we learnt when reading about Barbados’s national dish, cou-cou, is that when writing about anything Barbadian (or Bajan, more colloquially), one must mention Rihanna, because apparently this makes the piece more contemporary and down-with-the-kids. Of course, now here we are doing the same thing. It’s not an inappropriate reference though, because we’ve needed our umbrella-ella-ellas here in London over the past few days. What a miserable end to the summer it’s been!

The other thing we learnt is that, surprisingly for such a simple dish, there are a lot of versions of cou-cou out there. Essentially, it’s a cornmeal and okra mixture, topped with a fish stew – typically flying fish, although tilapia, sea bass and basa all work as substitutes if (like us) you can’t get hold of flying fish – but everyone seems to have his own way of doing it. In the end, we surprised ourselves by choosing a recipe from Jason Howard on Great British Chefs – not the sort of website we would usually gravitate towards for foreign cuisine, but its main advantage was that it provided a recipe for Bajan chopped seasoning, which other websites didn’t. The other comforting thing about Jason’s recipe was that he actually said that although it’s a Barbadian dish, it’s ‘also perfect for a typical British rainy day’ – and that is what we had! Don’t be put off by the seemingly long list of ingredients – you’ll find that a lot of them double up, and they’re mostly pretty common. Continue reading

Fish and chips with a twist: Saint Vincentian roasted breadfruit and fried jackfish

Today we return to the Caribbean, to Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, an island nation home to the filming of Pirates of the Caribbean and, for a time, Mick Jagger. Store that little titbit up for a future episode of University Challenge.

As you can see from its national dish, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is also home to the breadfruit, which is possibly the world’s largest and most expensive vegetable. At £7 each (‘What?! Imagine how many potatoes you could buy for £7!’ exclaimed Ash), it’s a good thing they’re nice! To serve two, this dish doesn’t use anywhere near a whole one (in fact, we only used a quarter, and that was with quite generous portions), but apparently they are best when roasted whole, so roast it whole we did. That means that we now have three-quarters of a breadfruit to use up, so if you have any suggestions, please comment below… Continue reading

A Bermuda short: Bermudian fish chowder

Before making this dish, we knew two things about Bermuda: shorts and Triangle. We’ve now bumped this up to three things, having added its traditional fish chowder to our repertoire. Unlike the creamy, thick chowders we’re used to, Bermuda’s version has a tomato base and isn’t stodgy at all. It’s also very spicy, thanks to the addition of chilli sauce (more on that in a minute) and is so full of vegetables that ‘fish chowder’ is almost a misnomer. Recipes on the Internet are all pretty similar but we thought The Bermudian seemed a reputable enough source – we just made a few tweaks here and there. Continue reading

Away and home: Canadian (Quebecois) mussel chowder

Leaving the food of Europe behind (for now) and jumping over to the Americas feels like we’ve really made some progress in this cooking journey. We started in Wales and have made our way through most of Europe, Asia and Oceania, discovering so many new dishes (and ingredients) along the way. Now we’re embarking on a whole new region, starting with Canada, which we are excited about – but which also posed a problem.

Many of you will be aware that Canada’s national dish is poutine: fries, cheese curds and gravy. Poutine seemed to experience a bit of a rebirth in London a couple of years ago, probably partially because of the ‘it’s cool to eat really unhealthy food and Instagram it’ age we’re in. (Speaking of which, remember that you can follow us on Instagram @goodfoodonbadplates – with very little unhealthy food, in fact!) We’d never actually tried it though, so the idea of making our own was quite fun… until we realised that we don’t have a deep fryer so wouldn’t be making brilliant fries, didn’t know where we’d get cheese curds from, and probably wouldn’t make gravy worthy of this revered dish. Continue reading